The son of an 18-year-old police officer who struck and killed two men says cannabis has not influenced him – Supply Weed Website Brampton Canada

Herb Approach
Max Coopey allegedly assaulted a press photographer as he was appearing today for the judicial inquiry into the deaths of the men he killed

Max Coopey allegedly assaulted a press photographer as he was appearing today for the judicial inquiry into the deaths of the men he killed

An 18-year-old drugmaker who had hit and killed two men after smoking cannabis but escaped arrogantly from prison had asked a lawyer at the forensic investigation today to "look for" on Google, after claiming that the cannabis in his blood did not stop him from driving.

Max Coopey, 18, hit and killed two pedestrians while driving his parents' Audi near Ascot last August, after smoking cannabis with friends.

Coopey, who is the son of two police officers, was not prosecuted for driving to death by dangerous driving and received only a community service order for the crime of driving under the influence of the drug at his trial in February.

Today, apart from investigating the deaths of these men, he allegedly assaulted a newspaper photographer, swearing and spitting at him before attempting to snatch the camera from his neck.

Coopey had exceeded the drug possession limit for cannabis when he hit and killed 48-year-old Jason Imi and 61-year-old John Shackley on a golf trip to work on August 2 last year.

The 18-year-old, then a minor, had only passed his driving test two months before the fatal collision and had already been sentenced to a series of convictions, mainly for drug use.

Coopey arrived dressed in a hooded top that he had first kept down on his face

Coopey arrived dressed in a hooded top that he had first kept down on his face

He insulted a press photographer before grabbing his cameras and spitting at him.

He insulted a press photographer before grabbing his cameras and spitting at him.

John Shackley, 61 years old

John Shackley, 61, left, and Jason Imi, 4, right, were killed as they returned from an evening meal with colleagues.

Jason Imi with his 18-year-old wife, Sarah. She told the court that their future together had been stolen

Jason Imi with his 18-year-old wife, Sarah. She told the court that their future together had been stolen

"Be respectful": how would a drug lord attack a press photographer while demanding respect

This morning, while going to the judicial inquiry, Coopey allegedly assaulted a press photographer.

Thames Valley police opened an investigation after 18-year-old Max Coopey allegedly seized the photographer's camera and tore it off his neck, spitting the man in front of the Reading Coroner's Court.

The 18-year-old also gave the photographer a sign of the major when he launched his 20-second angry attack this morning to customers in downtown Reading this morning, which was captured by television cameras. .

The photographer said: "Coopey came to testify at the inquest into the death of the two dead men after stoning him after smoking cannabis.

"I was expecting him to try to avoid me, but I did not expect to be attacked or take my camera," he said.

"He added insult to injury by giving me the salvation of the major that I captured as an image. For such a young man, he's really stupid. As the son of two police officers, one would think he would know better, "he added.

"He said to me" Do you know why I'm here? Have a little respect "which was a bit rich considering his performances later during the hearing."

A Thames Valley police spokesman later said, "We received a report of an assault that took place between 9:30 and 10 am this morning outside City Hall on Blagrave Street.

"A man in his thirties was attacked by another man. The victim suffered no injuries. An investigation was opened on the circumstances.

The investigation learned that during the collision last August, the two men were thrown with such force that they were thrown over the Audi and that they were dead on the spot, they were dead on the shot.

Despite the murder of the two men with his car, Coopey, whose parents, Russel Coopey and Catherine, were police officers, was not charged with driving under the influence of drugs. He was arrested and found that he had 3.3 mcg of cannabis in his blood – above the legal limit. of 2 mcg.

He said during a judicial inquiry today: "It is not because you have something in your blood that you are under the influence of it and that it may affect your ability to drive and this is part of any research.

"Look for him and look for him," he told the coroner and legal representatives at the hearing.

Alison McCormick, Berkshire Assistant Coroner, advised Mr. Coopey that he did not need to answer a question from a lawyer in Mr. Imi's family, Nicholas Hinchliffe, QC.

Mr. Hinchliffe told the teenager that he had been found with cannabis and traces of sedative codeine in his system.

The lawyer had asked, "Did you know that opiates were a sedative found in your blood system? Did you know that a combination of cannabis and opiates can affect your ability to drive safely? '

Mr. Coopey said, "I do not have to answer that question."

Mr. Hinchliffe agreed, and added that Mr. Coopey could answer the question if he wished. At that time, Mr. Coopey said, "Any combination of drugs can affect your ability to drive safely, but I am not, in my opinion, under the influence of cannabis."

He added that he had not taken any codeine on the night of the accident and no smoking since 18 hours, the day he had smoked a "cannabis cigarette" with his friends.

Mr. Coopey, who lives in his parents' home at The Burlings in Ascot, Berks., Testified at the double investigation in Reading.

His father, Russel, police sergeant at the Metropolitan Police who had rushed to the scene the night of the collision when his son called him to tell him that he had hit people with the car, testified in the report of the investigation. .

He had allowed his son to borrow his car because his own BMW, a repairer after a collision, had been informed by the coroner.

Sgt. Coopey said: 'We agreed that he had to be back before midnight and that he had to drive safely. He acknowledged and accepted that.

Mr. Hinchliffe told Mr. Coopey, "You asked to borrow your father's car. Your father gave you strict instructions as to when you should give it back.

Mr. Coopey replied, "What I do not normally obey."

Zen Ogilvy, pictured, was in the car when Coopey hit and killed the two men last August.

Zen Ogilvy, pictured, was in the car when Coopey hit and killed the two men last August.

61-year-old John Shackley was returning from a hotel in Ascot after a dinner with colleagues when he was hit by the car driven by Max Coopey.

61-year-old John Shackley was returning from a hotel in Ascot after a dinner with colleagues when he was hit by the car driven by Max Coopey.

Jason Imi was thrown into the air by the collision and died immediately, the investigation revealed

Jason Imi was thrown into the air by the collision and died immediately, the investigation revealed

The lawyer stated at the inquest that Mr. Coopey's father was a police officer in action and asked the witness to confirm that his father was a sergeant, which, according to Mr. Coopey, was "very "but maintained that it was irrelevant.

Mr. Hinchliffe then asked Mr. Coopey why he had not slowed down as he approached a lane in the road, a blind spot, and why he did not have his headlights on .

Towards the end of the interview, Mr. Coopey said, "I may have slowed down a bit. Even if I had not done it, even if I had not done it, it would have worked perfectly because that's how they taught you to drive.

"You do not slow down in front of the possibility that someone is on the other side of a blind corner. I do not expect someone on the road, you drive as usual, as any driver would.

"If someone else was in the same situation, the same thing would have happened. You can keep asking me questions to try to make it look … '

Max Coopey admitted to driving drugs but was not prosecuted for reckless or dangerous driving

Max Coopey admitted to driving drugs but was not prosecuted for reckless or dangerous driving

Drug Use and Addiction Laws: How does the police measure legal and illegal drugs to determine if you are "strong" at the wheel?

In 2015, new regulations to prevent people from driving with drugs entered into force in England and Wales.

Drivers are now being prosecuted if they exceed the limits set for the presence of eight illicit drugs, including cannabis and cocaine, and eight prescription drugs.

Police can use roadside drug testing devices.

The legal drug use limits for legal drugs such as morphine and diazepam are set at levels that are likely to cause a disability, and users must be prepared to justify the presence of the drug in their system.

But the limits for illicit drugs are set at "zero tolerance" levels, essentially as low as police equipment can detect.

But the fact that there are traces of drugs in your system – maybe drug use several hours before driving – does not mean that drugs hurt your driving.

Nevertheless, you will be prosecuted for "driving a motor vehicle with a controlled drug proportion exceeding the specified limit" as part of efforts to combat drug abuse.

The coroner intervened to remind Mr. Coopey that Mr. Hinchliffe was asking questions that he was allowed to ask in the forensic investigation, in order to determine who the deceased was, when and where they died and how.

Sol Russell-Coyle, passenger in the car, told the coroner in his live testimony: "I am traumatized. It's quite difficult for an 18-year-old boy to experience this.

Edwin Buckett, a lawyer representing Mr. Shackley's family, asked Mr. Coopey, "Have you ever smoked cannabis before driving before?"

Mr. Coopey replied, "Does this have any relevance?"

Mr. Buckett insisted, "Did you understand that your ability to drive would be altered in a certain way?"

Mr. Coopey said that he did not want to answer that question if he did not have to, and he did not remember very well the night because it was a year ago.

Jeffrey Wakeling, who was Mr. Imi and who was responsible for Mr. Shackley at Computacentre, told the investigation that the two men were part of a group of nine men staying at the Royal Berkshire Hotel in Sunningdale, Berks ., For an annual work.

They had all eaten at a nearby Italian restaurant, Pazzia, on London Road. The men had wine with their meal and Mr. Wakeling said they were all in a good mood.

A toxicology report on the two dead men showed that they had exceeded the drunk driving limit.

Max Coopey hit and killed two pedestrians while driving the Audi of his parents who smoked cannabis

Max Coopey hit and killed two pedestrians while driving the Audi of his parents who smoked cannabis

Mr. Wakeling stated that since he had returned to the hotel shortly before midnight, the nine people had split into groups, with MM. Imi and Shackley in the back.

He said they had heard the sound of a car hitting a deer on the 50 km / h stretch of road behind them, which is completely straight for 800 meters, the survey found.

He said someone in the group said, "Christ, it sounds bad. I hope he was not one of our guys.

Mr. Coopey's father stated in the statement that he rushed to the scene by taxi after his son called him, looking panicked and frightened, and said, "Dad, I had an accident, someone ran in front of me. and I hit them. I think they can be dead.

After arriving at the scene, Sgt. Coopey had introduced himself to the other officers as Max's father. At this stage of the evidence, the coroner, Ms. McCormick, has stated that she will not read the rest of her statement.

When counsel Hinchliffe asked Mr. Coopey if his father was an active police officer, the coroner said that he did not think the question was relevant, but Mr. Hinchliffe had ignored that objection and had again until Mr. Coopey responds.

Mr. Buckett suggested to Mr. Coopey that if he had dropped his friend Zen in Hampton, where he lived, he would not have come home at midnight as his father had asked him to do.

The lawyer said, "Your father said you must be back by midnight."

Mr. Coopey replied, 'But, as you can imagine, I would not always be back at midnight. You're trying to suggest that I was hurrying, but it's completely wrong. It's completely absurd.

Mr. Buckett said, "You can not be back at midnight, but you do not want to be too late after midnight."

The investigation revealed that the victims were Mr. Shackley, from Deanshanger, Milton Keynes, Bucks., Sales Manager, and Mr. Imi, Solutions Specialist, from the same European computer services company, Computacenter.

Shackley's daughter, Danielle Shackley, 31, and Milton Keynes, participated in the survey with her partner, Jesse Potton.

Sarah Imi, Mr. Imi's widow, who had been with Jason for almost 22 years, was also present.

They were two weeks away from their 18th wedding anniversary when he passed away and they had three children.

The hearing continues.

Chronology: offenses of Max Coopey – from 12 years

2013 to 2018: Max Coopey, the son of the police, aged 12 to 17, sentences five convictions for seven offenses, mainly for drugs.

June 2018One of these offenses occurred just eight weeks before the murder, when the police arrested the 17-year-old for impaired driving and found that he smelled cannabis. He had 5.7mcgs in his blood.

August 2, 2018: While waiting to appear in court, Max Coopey smokes cannabis with friends, then takes the wheel of the powerful Audi A5 of his parents to take his friends by car.

11:27 p.m.Police received a first report of the accident in which the car driven by Coopey struck and killed John Shackley, 61, and Jason Imi, 48, as they crossed the road after a meal with colleagues.

11:34 p.m.: Coopey is arrested at the scene, suspected of causing death by dangerous driving.

August 3 00h02: He passes a breathalyzer but does not get a rag for cannabis.

UNKNOWN TIME: The blood of Coopey is taken by the police. It contains 3.3 μg of cannabis per 100 ml, exceeding the authorized limit.

November 2018: Coopey is convicted of the drug offense in June by a court.

January 30, 2019: Max Coopey pled guilty to driving under the influence of drugs at the wheel of the August accident, which killed MM. Imi and Shackley. He remains anonymous even though the CPS has joined the press to ask for his identity. He gets out of court with 100 hours of community service.

May 25, 2019Max Coopey is 18 years old and is named by this newspaper.

July 8, 2019: An inquest into deaths will open at the Coroner's Court in Reading.

The widows of the two dead men made written statements at the January trial.

Sarah Imi was Jason Imi's partner for almost 22 years and they were just days away from their 18th wedding anniversary. The couple had three children together.

Ms. Imi said, "We had so many plans for our future together and I think it was stolen.

'Why was he driving such a powerful car? It seems that no lesson has been learned.

Ms. Imi's lawyer, Soyab Patel, told MailOnline that the Imi family was outraged by this conviction. He added, "If you ask any member of the public," a guy drives down the road, he killed two people, and he was over the cannabis limit, and he had 100 hours of community service. "answer to what, are you kidding I hope?"

In January, in court, a statement by Mrs. Shackley read: "I used to work in a school before. I know that some children need more discipline.

"Parents need to help them choose the right path of life to prevent them from getting into dangerous situations.

"He was able to drive a powerful car and the family might have had to be more alert.

"My husband was killed after a meal with colleagues. He said he would be back around 11 o'clock.

"He was killed on the spot just 5-10 minutes walk from the restaurant.

"Our only hope is that they feel no pain or fear – this is our only consolation".

In February, Judge Penny Wood, who presided over the judiciary, sentenced Coopey to jail time. The "initial thought" of his colleagues was to imprison him. '

However, she added, "There are no charges regarding the level of your driving that day. But we can start by saying that everyone can be heard, that we take it very seriously. '

Magistrates gave Coopey a new youth re-education order including 24-month supervision, a 20-day "reflection" program, a safe driving course, 100 hours of unpaid work and a six-month curfew .

The teenager was also forbidden to drive for 24 months and charged £ 105, which his parents promised to pay.

The magistrates suggested that he could pay them back by doing odd jobs at home.

Herb Approach

Here is what you want to know before visiting your local medical dispensary:You will require a doctor’s recommendation, medical cannabis certification, or whatever proper documentation is required by your condition. Ordinarily, you need to be 18 or older to qualify for a medical authorization, but exceptions could be made in some conditions for minors with especially debilitating problems. You will often enroll with a medicinal dispensary. This is to maintain your medical cannabis recommendation or certificate on file for legal and regulatory purposes. There’ll be a waiting room. This is to control the flow of patients and product, but a simple dividing wall also gives patients solitude and direct one-on-one contact with a budtender to discuss medical problems. This procedure can help budtenders and patients monitor effective medication in addition to have a living record of producers and products for future reference and follow up. Medicinal dispensaries usually allow you to smell and examine the buds before buy. This may vary from state-to-state.

DOES AN APPLICANT NEED MUNICIPAL APPROVAL BEFORE RECEIVING A RETAIL CANNABIS LICENSE? Yes, municipal approval is necessary prior to the AGLC will subject a retail cannabis license. Applicants should get in touch with their planned municipality to learn requirements regarding municipal retail cannabis legislation, zoning requirements, land-use limitations, and location requirements regarding how near a retail store is to a provincial medical care centre, school, or parcel of land designated as a school book.
Keep non-medical cannabis legal Adults that are 19 years or older are in a position to:Have up to 30 gram of authorized dried cannabis or the equivalent on their own person. Share up to 30 g of legal cannabis with other adults in Canada. Buy cannabis goods from a Yukon Liquor Corporation licensed merchant. Grow up to four plants per family. It’s illegal to present non invasive cannabis to anyone under the age of 19 and also for anybody below the age of 19 to possess any quantity of anti inflammatory cannabis in Yukon.It is illegal and dangerous to drive while under the influence of cannabis or other intoxicants.

Herb Approach

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